Supporters give reaction to mine decision

The east coast resort town of Whitby which is near to the  proposed site for the York Potash Mine near Whitby in the North York Moors National Park, as councillors are discussing whether to allow what is potentially the world's biggest potash mine to be constructed in one of England's national parks. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Tuesday June 30, 2015. The proposal by Sirius Minerals to build the mine near Whitby, in the North York Moors National Park, came after around 1.3 billion tonnes of polyhalite was discovered below the protected Yorkshire coastline - believed to be the world's biggest and best quality supply of the valuable mineral. See PA story ENVIRONMENT Potash. Photo credit should read: John Giles/PA Wire
The east coast resort town of Whitby which is near to the proposed site for the York Potash Mine near Whitby in the North York Moors National Park, as councillors are discussing whether to allow what is potentially the world's biggest potash mine to be constructed in one of England's national parks. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Tuesday June 30, 2015. The proposal by Sirius Minerals to build the mine near Whitby, in the North York Moors National Park, came after around 1.3 billion tonnes of polyhalite was discovered below the protected Yorkshire coastline - believed to be the world's biggest and best quality supply of the valuable mineral. See PA story ENVIRONMENT Potash. Photo credit should read: John Giles/PA Wire

The people of Whitby have been giving their reaction to this week’s decision to allow a potash mine to be built on the outskirts of the town.

It is mainly felt that the benefits to local families and young people wanting a variety of jobs will outweigh the temporary disruption and the effects such a development will undoubtedly have on the North York Moors National Park.

Cllr Joe Plant who represents the West Cliff area of the town on behalf of both the borough and county councils said: “It is great news for the town and for future generations. We have got to give our local youngsters some aspirations and to help them if they want to stay in the town.

“For the local economy yes there will be some disruption and I understand those concerns but you have to think it is a case of short term pain for long term gain.”

Keith Prytherch, the principal at Caedmon College said the mine project would also have educational benefits for youngsters who are still of school age.

He told the Gazette: “We are really pleased with the decision here at the college. It offers youngsters the chance to be involved in global industry but working locally.

“We are already working with partners about how we can produce the workforce of the future.

“It is a time when youngsters should be celebrating and thinking I don’t need to move that far away to access jobs and opportunities.

“I In terms of the immediate benefit we are already working closely with York Potash and students on apprenticeship programmes in engineering for example.

“It is a time of great opportunity that the community needs to get behind.”

John Freeman, chairman of the Whitby and District Tourism Association said the organisation had mixed feelings towards the decision.

“The association were broadly in approval of the mine development but with real concerns of the traffic situation during the building of the mine itself.

“All the regulations that are going to be put in place must be enforced rigorously. And there is a real concern that the 106 money is being funnelled back into the National Park when it is Whitby that will see the brunt of the disruption.”

However, he added he didn’t think people would be put off visiting the town.

He added: “If you look at Whitby in July and August on a normal day there is traffic backed up and people are still prepared to come - it has that hold over people.

“Whitby will survive - it is a premier tourist destination and despite a hiccup it will continue to be.”