'Radical changes' to plan for apartments at Sneaton Castle, near Whitby, but council says it is an overdevelopment and out of character

The Sneaton Castle site
The Sneaton Castle site

A new extra care facility that was proposed as part of the High Stakesby development in Whitby could be given the green light this week.

Yourlife Management Ltd lodged plans with Scarborough Council for the development at Sneaton Castle, which will see more than 240 new homes built when it is completed.

The extra-care facility was part of the original plans and the details were put out to consultation earlier this year.

Scarborough Council’s planning committee will decide whether to grant approval when it meets tomorrow (Thursday) with its officers recommending that permission be granted.

A number of objections were received to the plans and, in response, the applicant made changes to the scheme, including a reduction in the length and height of sections of the building and alterations to the finish.

The number of extra-care apartments was also reduced from 72 to 65.

The documents submitted to the council state: “[The applicant] has agreed to and made several radical changes to address the concerns highlighted, the resultant scheme has regrettably lost seven from the initially submitted scheme.

“We trust this reduction in quantum and design changes, which we believe has resulted in key design and neighbour relationship positives for all concerned, can be seen to show the positive engagement with officers, and demonstrates how the local concern of neighbours has been considered and addressed in recent weeks.”

Across two consultations more than 40 objections were received to the plans.

Whitby Town Council said the scheme was “considered to be out of character and an overdevelopment of the site”.

One member of the public wrote to say: “I note in the revised application that the number of retirement units has been reduced from 72 to 65, this is a very small reduction in units, and is still too large a development for the site. The building is still a grotesque size and doesn’t flow with the surrounding properties.”

Another also felt the building was too large. They added: “In the revised plans the building is still three storeys high, and it has only been reduced to two storeys at the east and west ends of the northern elevation.

“This is not an acceptable size for the building, and the whole building should be reduced from three to two storeys.”

In recommending approval, council planning officers say the plans “strike a balance” between the housing development and the local area.