New Whitby exhibition details Sirius Minerals’ mining project

The new exhibition all about Sirius Minerals at Whitby Museum. Wednesday 14 February. Picture: Ceri Oakes w18070f
The new exhibition all about Sirius Minerals at Whitby Museum. Wednesday 14 February. Picture: Ceri Oakes w18070f

Sirius Minerals, the company behind the development of Woodsmith Mine near Whitby, has launched a new exhibition about the project at Whitby Museum.

Entitled From Woodsmith to the World: The Story of Sirius Minerals’ Polyhalite Project, the exhibition takes visitors through the geological and mining history of the area, and describes how the mine will be built and function, before detailing the role the company’s polyhalite fertilizer will play in helping farmers around the world increase crop yields to feed a growing global population.

Matt Parsons, External Affairs Manager for Sirius Minerals, at the new Woodsmith Mine exhibition at Whitby Museum.

Matt Parsons, External Affairs Manager for Sirius Minerals, at the new Woodsmith Mine exhibition at Whitby Museum.

The exhibition also covers the community work the company is doing in the local area and its collaboration on environmental projects with the North York Moors National Park Authority.

“The mine has generated a lot of local interest in the area, due to the jobs and investment the project will provide,” said Matt Parsons, External Affairs Manager for Sirius Minerals.

“The exhibition is an opportunity for people to find out about how the unique polyhalite deposit we’ve found here in North Yorkshire can have a significant impact on global food production.”

Sirius Minerals’ project involves the construction of two deep mineshafts to access the polyhalite deposit, connected to a 23-mile tunnel to transport the mineral via conveyor belt to Teesside, where it will be processed and shipped around the world. Construction of the mine began last year and is due to enter production in late 2021, creating up to 2,500 jobs and £2.5bn of exports.

“There is a long history of mining in Yorkshire and the North East, and lots of curiosity, knowledge and expertise among local people on the topic,” say Whitby Literary and Philosophical Society.

“So we were delighted when Sirius proposed the idea of holding an exhibition in the museum.

“There is also an interesting story to tell about their exploration of the geology of the area, which ties in well with many of the permanent exhibits in the museum.”

The exhibition is now open at Whitby Museum, Pannett Park.

The museum is open from 9.30am to 4.30pm every day except Mondays.