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Wreath display at Aislaby''Quality Street wreath''w115302c
Wreath display at Aislaby''Quality Street wreath''w115302c
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DURING the festive period, an Aislaby church has been hosting a display of around 50 Christmas wreaths, donated by Whitby residents.

St Margaret’s church has been open between 1pm and 3pm each day, when people can pop in to check out the display.

Reverend David Cook at the wreath display at Aislaby''w115302a

Reverend David Cook at the wreath display at Aislaby''w115302a

The display is only in its second year, but many individuals and businesses in Whitby and the surrounding area have contributed to the display, by creating their own wreaths.

The designs are all individual and extravagant, for example one is made entirely of Quality Street chocolates.

The vicar of St Margaret’s, the Rev David Cook, explained where the tradition of hanging wreaths began.

“The tradition goes back a long way, to the time of the Ancient Greeks, when they would be placed on the head of somebody who had won in the Olympic games.

“Then it came to the Christian church in the early centuries, and in the New Testament reference is made to the Christian journey being likened to running the race that’s set before us, so there’s a very strong connection.”

A wide range of wreath designs were on display, but traditionally the advent wreath has featured four candles in a circle of evergreens, with a fifth candle in the middle.

Throughout Advent a candle is lit each week, until Christmas Eve, when the final centre candle is lit, to represent the birth of Jesus Christ.