No public conveniences for anglers

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OH DEAR! WHAT CAN THE MATTER BE?

POOR OLD WHITBY ‘S GOT NO PUBLIC LAVATORIES

AN ANGLER COULD SEARCH FROM MONDAY TO SATURDAY

AND STILL FIND NOWHERE TO GO

Having, hopefully, attracted the attention of your readers and an even bigger hope, that of the local council, I would wish to draw attention to what I consider to be a problem that leaves me and no doubt many other anglers somewhat “indisposed”. I refer of course to the apparent total lack of any public conveniences that are open before 7am in Whitby.

As many of your readers will be aware Whitby sells its self as one of the premier sea angling ports in Britain.

Whitby attracts anglers from all parts of Britain, as far afield as Glasgow in the North to the Isles of White in the South.

Many of these visitors are willing to travel vast distances, usually through the night to reach Whitby in time to board their chosen fishing vessels many of which sail at 7am each day.

Not only are the anglers paying for their fishing they also spend money in many of the local shops and must provide a substantial income to the coffers of Whitby.

Surely a group of visitors that must be welcome in Whitby and deserve some recognition and consideration.

A friend and I recently made such a small trek from York intent on a day at sea.

Having arrived in Whitby about 6am nature called, but oh what a challenge presented itself, that of finding an open WC. The ones adjacent to the band stand, closed, the ones opposite the railway station, closed, the ones on the marina near the Co-op, closed, the ones adjacent to the fishing pontoons on the old town side, closed.

A pretty desperate situation knowing that the boats do not have WCs.

I would also mention the fact that I cannot recall the nearest available toilets on a journey to Whitby at night.

None of the A1 services, as far as I am aware, are open through the night, likewise the A64 from the A1 is doubtful.

A search for information proved futile. Fear not, on the horizon a saviour appeared, a lady in shining armour came to our rescue. Problem explained, futility of search discussed, an offer of relief provided and taken. Thanks to our saviour for her “Co-op”-eration in rescuing us.

I do not for a moment think that we have been the only anglers to face this challenge and so I ask myself, what impression of Whitby does this create in the mind of the visiting Angler? More especially in this day of limited available spending money.

I fully appreciate the need for security of property and the damage often inflicted on these type of premises but surely an option could be found to make available access. It cannot be that difficult surely. Could the “Skippers” be given a key like the “disabled system” or even a code for a digital lock?

I put it to the Whitby Council that they should recognise the income from anglers visiting Whitby and take a more proactive approach in resolving a problem that at some point in time will, without doubt, cause each and every ones of us inconvenience, embarrassment, or distress.

In these financially difficult times I feel that more effort should be made in trying to keep income coming into Whitby, not displaying a “couldn’t care less attitude” towards anglers.

Jim Dawson, (frequent angling visitor to Whitby), Haxby, York by email