VIDEO: Whitby train renamed after Dracula author

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The author who used Whitby as his inspiration to write Dracula had a train named in his honour in a special ceremony in the town.

In Bram Stoker’s novel, Dracula arrived in Whitby aboard the Russian schooner, the Demeter, whose cargo consisted of crates of earth.

Northern Rail's Programmes and Planning Director, Rob Warnes, steps out of the box to greet Whitby Town Mayor Heather Coughlan and Bram Stoker's great-great-grandson, Robin MacCaw

Northern Rail's Programmes and Planning Director, Rob Warnes, steps out of the box to greet Whitby Town Mayor Heather Coughlan and Bram Stoker's great-great-grandson, Robin MacCaw

The scene was re-enacted in Northern Rail’s Saturday’s event at Whitby Railway Station as a mysterious dark spectre emerged from the shadows on platform one.

It was, in fact, Northern Rail’s programmes and planning director, Rob Warnes, appearing as Dracula, who emerged from a crate to introduce Irishman Stoker’s great-grandson Robin MacCaw for a short speech.

In 1890, Stoker began to research and write Dracula.

That August, his family holidayed in Whitby and he spent considerable time undertaking local research which would significantly shape the book.

This included the development of characters, settings and elements of the plot.

It was at the Whitby Subscription Library that Stoker encountered the name ‘Dracula’ for the first time, which he soon used for his vampire.

On Saturday, the class 156 train which arrived in Whitby at 3.35pm and quickly loaded with passengers, was renamed before departing as Bram Stoker.