Works to overhaul Mayfield junction to start within year

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WORKS on overhauling the Mayfield Road traffic junction could start within the next year.

A re-designed set of plans was unveiled at an extra-ordinary meeting of Whitby Town Council on Wednesday night after a previous meeting where the public had complained about the lack of information being given over such an important issue.

There had also been massive concern about proposals to restrict movements in and out of Waterstead Lane as part of the project but officers confirmed this had been dropped.

Stephen Wright, a North Yorkshire County Council traffic signals engineer, told the meeting: “The option to ban the turn gave the best result in terms of capacity improvement but because of the public opinion we decided to scrap this idea and go with this plan. It is still a significant improvement.”

The new plan will see road and lane markings made clearer, a Puffin type crossing point on every arm of the junction, the removal of the crossing point on Prospect Hill and the pelican crossing on Mayfield Road and updated traffic lights and electrics.

The upgrading of the traffic lights themselves is already ten years overdue and maintenance of them is proving problematic due to their age.

Officers said the programme of work was vital in order to keep traffic around the already busy junction flowing and recent surveys suggested there are over 1480 cars coming through the junction in a morning and 1870 plus in the afternoon.

One of the reasons the work hasn’t been done before is that it relied on government money which was withdrawn in the last round of austerity cuts.

The scheme will now be financed via £350,000 worth of compensation payments from developers (Sainsbury’s, Homebase and Barratts for the Larpool Lane development) in lieu of lost open space and £50,000 from the NYCC budget.

Whitby Town Council voted in favour of supporting the new scheme, which once the public consultation period ends next Friday, will be put out to tender.

Coun Joe Plant, who didn’t support the last plan, welcomed the new one and said it was how democracy should work.