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RNLI crew celebrate 190th birthday

RNLI mechanic Glen Goodberry holding a picture of John Storr, who got a silver medal in 1853, the earliest Whitby coxwain recorded on camera

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RNLI mechanic Glen Goodberry holding a picture of John Storr, who got a silver medal in 1853, the earliest Whitby coxwain recorded on camera w141008

 

Today marks the 190th anniversary of the founding of the RNLI.

But did you know that a lifeboat crew has been saving lives from Whitby since 1802?

Mechanic Glenn Goodberry talked us through some interesting facts about Whitby’s proud lifeboat heritage.

Whitby Lifeboat Station joined the institution in 1861 following the tragedy that saw 12 of 13 crewmembers perishing during a rescue.

The lifeboat station was actually established 59 years before this.

Its first lifeboat was called Lucy and cost just £182.

The 31ft boat was built in 1789 and during its nine-year service was launched just nine times, saving 53 lives in the process.

By comparison, the current Trent-class lifeboat, the George and Mary Webb, arrived at the station in 1996 and cost £1.1million

The 1914 rescue of passengers aboard the Rohilla is considered one of the greatest in the history of the RNLI.

In 1829 the station received the first of its 100 awards.

The Gold medal was given to Lieutenant J Lingard after he helped rescue seven lives from the ‘Esther’, which was wrecked near Robin Hood’s Bay

 

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