DCSIMG

Potash manager and his business links come out

Former Chairman of Cleveland Police Dave McLuckie arrives Newcastle Crown Court where he is accused of perverting the course of justice by persuading the late Maurice Ward to take three penalty points for him in 2005. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Tuesday June 18, 2013. See PA story COURTS Mcluckie. Photo credit should read: Owen Humphreys/PA Wire

Former Chairman of Cleveland Police Dave McLuckie arrives Newcastle Crown Court where he is accused of perverting the course of justice by persuading the late Maurice Ward to take three penalty points for him in 2005. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Tuesday June 18, 2013. See PA story COURTS Mcluckie. Photo credit should read: Owen Humphreys/PA Wire

DAVE McLuckie, the disgraced former chairman of Cleveland Police Authority and ex employee of the Boulby Potash Mine, was a paid consultant with a heating company which was given contracts by the authority without the need go out to tender.

Mr McLuckie, represented Skelton on Redcar and Cleveland Borough Council, and was a one time member of the North York Moors National Park Authority;

He was jailed for eight months last summer after being found guilty for perverting the course of justice when he persuaded a friend to accept his speeding points.

Now Mr McLuckie (52) of Great Ayton, it has been revealed in documents released following the police Operation Sacristy investigation ended, had close links with the Middlesbrough company Combi UK which received contracts worth £26,000 from the police authority.

He claimed he had taken no part in contract negotiations or the bidding process and that he had declared his link to the company in the Borough Council and Police Authority Register of Members’ Interests.

But, the contract has been investigated as part of Operation Sacristy which also identified a lack of ethical leadership and effective governance at the highest level of Cleveland Police and Cleveland Police Authority.

The operation cost £4.6 million over four years but ended with no criminal charges being brought,

In total, between June 2006 and July 2011, the company had been awarded contracts worth £94,468.79 by the police authority.

Last December, Mr McLuckie was found not guilty of witness intimidation.

The police have since released figures which showed that he claimed £123,124 in allowances, subsistence and mileage between 2005 and 2010.

After he and the nine others investigated had been told they would not be charged with any criminal offence following the Operation Sacristy inquiry, Mr McLuckie was reported to have said that his life had been ruined by the investigation.

 

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