Little-known art set to star in walking festival

� Tony Bartholomew/Turnstone Media
07802 400651/info@turnstonemedia.co.uk
26th May 2017


Kate Gillies at one of two little-known artworks by world-famous environmental artist Andy Goldsworthy which will be the highlight of this years Rosedale Walking Festival.

Now in its fifth year, the festival will take place on Saturday 24 and Sunday 25 June based around Rosedale which is in the heart of the North York Moors National Park

The two Goldsworthy artworks  which Kate will lead a walk to take the form of stone-built structures with mysterious natural contents, entitled Fireplace (pictured)  and Red House. They are usually only accessible by prior appointment.
� Tony Bartholomew/Turnstone Media 07802 400651/info@turnstonemedia.co.uk 26th May 2017 Kate Gillies at one of two little-known artworks by world-famous environmental artist Andy Goldsworthy which will be the highlight of this years Rosedale Walking Festival. Now in its fifth year, the festival will take place on Saturday 24 and Sunday 25 June based around Rosedale which is in the heart of the North York Moors National Park The two Goldsworthy artworks which Kate will lead a walk to take the form of stone-built structures with mysterious natural contents, entitled Fireplace (pictured) and Red House. They are usually only accessible by prior appointment.

A walk taking in two little-known artworks by world-famous environmental artist Andy Goldsworthy will be the highlight of this year’s Rosedale Walking Festival.

Now in its fifth year, the festival, in the heart of the North York Moors National Park, will take place on Saturday June 24 and Sunday June 25.

The two Goldsworthy artworks take the form of stone-built structures with mysterious natural contents, entitled Fireplace and Red House. They are usually only accessible by appointment.

Walk leader Kate Gillies said: “The ‘In Search of Andy Goldsworthy’ walk will give people the opportunity to see two lesser-known artworks by the man who many regard as one of the world’s greatest environmental artists. These are living works of art that will evolve and change with the seasons and with age.”

Festival participants can choose from a selection of other walks over the weekend, including an in-depth look at the history of the ironstone boom in Rosedale in the 19th Century, a meander round the local teashops, and a short ramble with magical elements for families with young children

Places on the Walking Festival events range from £1 for the family walk to £12 for the teashop walk; most cost £4. Children take part for free.